Alan Bullock - Hitler

Hitler was anti-Liberal as well as anti-Marxist:

“Hitler spoke of 'stamping the Nazi Weltanschauung on the German people'. For its highest duty was intolerance: 'it is only the harshest principles and an iron resolution which can unite the nation into a single body capable of resistance – and thereby able to be led successfully in politics. The main plank in the Nationalist Socialist programme,' Hitler declared in 1937, 'is to abolish the liberalistic concept of the individual and the Marxist concept of humanity and to substitute for them the Volk community, rooted in the soil and bound together by the bond of its common blood.'

“While Hitler's attitude towards liberalism was one of contempt, towards Marxism he showed an implacable hostility” (405).

Democracy is a capitalist tool:

“… Democracy has laid the world in ruins, and nevertheless you want to extend it to the economic sphere. It would be the end of German economy. … The capitalists have worked their way to the top through their capacity, and on the basis of this selection, which again only proves their higher race, they have a right to lead” (158). 

“Hitler had no use for any democratic institution: free speech, free press, or parliament” (41).

Oxford Online Dictionary

fascism | | faSH| izəm | (also Fascism)

An authoritarian and nationalistic right-wing system of government and social organization.

 

• (in general use) extreme right-wing, authoritarian, or intolerant views or practice.

 

The term Fascism was first used of the totalitarian right-wing nationalist regime of Mussolini in Italy (1922–43); the regimes of the Nazis in Germany and Franco in Spain were also Fascist. Fascism tends to include a belief in the supremacy of one national or ethnic group, a contempt for democracy, an insistence on obedience to a powerful leader, and a strong demagogic approach.

 

1920s: from Italian fascismo, from fascio “bundle, political group”, from Latin fascis (see fasces).

—definition of “fascism” in the Oxford online dictionary